All posts by Gwendolyn Miller

About Gwendolyn Miller

A Singular Vision For the past decade, Ms. Gwendolyn Miller focused her career exclusively on providing educators with tools designed to identify and eliminate racial microaggressions in the classroom. As a result, she has developed pedagogical strategies that enable teachers to create the optimal academic environment, free of racial microaggressions. Through her online courses, educators gain expert insights into the classroom experiences of students of color and their responses to racial microaggressions. As a result, educators will learn the major causes of racial microaggressions: The failure to recognize unconscious biases; The failure to recognize how unconscious bias plays a major role in discriminatory assumptions about students of color; The failure to recognize how these assumptions affect daily interactions with students of color; and The failure to recognize how these assumptions ultimately result in racial microaggressions. A Lifetime of Relevant Experience Following a career as a classroom teacher, Gwendolyn decided to pursue her Master of Science Degree in Education from the Applied Psychology and Human Development Division of the University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education. During her studies, she conducted significant research on the issue of racial microaggressions in the classroom. Inspired by her research, she embarked on her a career as a consultant on racial microaggressions. She has worked with school faculties and district leaders to promote positive inter-ethnic interactions and enhance the educational experience of students of color. A Proven Approach Gwendolyn has presented workshops related to the problem of systemic racism in educational institutions at numerous conferences including the National Association for Multicultural Education, Teachers College Roundtable on Multicultural Psychology and Education, National Conference on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Higher Education, American Psychological Association Convention and the National Association of Independent Schools People of Color Conference.

How can we change the prevalent negative media images about Black men and boys?

Opportunity Agenda’s Eleni Delimpaltadaki Janis walks us through their report “Opportunity for Black Men and Boys.” In the video, she discusses how prevalent negative media images about Black men and boys fuel punitive approaches to solving society’s problems and what can be done about it.

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Multicultural Education, a Radical Response of Love, Life and Dr. King’s Dream

Multicultural education was born out of the struggles of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, a foundation built on advocacy and resistance. As we gather in Memphis for the 28th Annual International Conference of the National Association for Multicultural Education, we honor the Civil Rights Movement, which not only brought change to the United States, but to the rest of the world. During this 50th anniversary year of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, the National Association for Multicultural Education calls for radical education that meet the needs of an emerging majority-minority nation, empowers marginalized groups, challenges anti-blackness, xenophobia, all forms of oppression, and neoliberal efforts that seek to make unjust practices more palatable. There can be no apartheid United States or any place else with the expectation of acceptance from people of color. Multicultural education must challenge policies that seek to roll back more civil rights gains, for which Dr. King and a diversity of others fought. In a time when public education in the United States is under attack, nationalism, nativism, and xenophobia are also on the rise, Multicultural education must forge ahead and respond to these challenges with clarity of purpose.

The National Association for Multicultural Education invites researchers, practitioners, community activists, policymakers and all those working toward greater equity in education around the world to the 28th Annual International Conference. The conference is a time to engage in dialogue, share research, best practices, and collaborate across contexts locally and globally to take action that disrupts injustices and inequities in education and resists attacks to diminish public education disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable rural and urban communities. Dr. King reminded us that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere and, now more than ever, Multicultural Education must be at the forefront in reviving Dr. King’s dream.

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