Research

Implicit bias may help explain high preschool expulsion rates for black children

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Preschool teachers and staff show signs of implicit bias in administering discipline, but the race of the teacher plays a big role in the outcome, according to research conducted by the Yale Child Study Center. The results help explain why black students tend to be suspended at much higher rates than white students, the authors say.

Source: Implicit bias may help explain high preschool expulsion rates for black children — ScienceDaily

Race biases teachers’ expectations for students: White teachers more likely to doubt educational prospects of black boys and girls 

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When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new study by Johns Hopkins University concludes. This is especially true for black boys.

Source: Race Biases Teachers’ Expectations for Students:White teachers more likely to doubt educational prospects of black boys and girls

Color Blind? Bias-aware whites better for modern race challenges

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Some white Americans like to pat themselves on the back for being racially color-blind. But a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology finds that whites aware of their biases are better equipped to address contemporary racial challenges, where prejudice is often expressed in subtle, unintentional and unconscious ways.

Source: Color Blind? Bias-Aware Whites Better for Modern Race Challenges

Do race-based stressors contribute to the achievement gap?

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Race-based stressors, including perceived discrimination and the fear of fulfilling negative stereotypes, have psychological effects and physiological effects on the body, which may contribute to the racial-ethnic achievement gap.

In a review published in the journal American Psychologist, the researchers argue that the psychological stress associated with perceptions of discrimination and stereotype threat — and the body’s physiologic response to that stress — may help explain the achievement gap.

Source: Do race-based stressors contribute to the achievement gap? — ScienceDaily

Students of all races prefer teachers of color

 

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Middle and high school students, regardless of their race and ethnicity, have more favorable perceptions of their Black and Latino teachers than of their White teachers, finds a study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

Source: Students of all races prefer teachers of color, finds study — ScienceDaily

Preschool educators’ implicit bias contributes to racial disparities in school readiness

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Preschool expulsions and the disproportionate expulsion of Black boys have gained attention in recent years, but little has been done to understand the underlying causes behind this issue. The Yale Child Center examined the potential role of preschool educators’ implicit biases as a viable partial explanation behind disparities in preschool expulsions.

Do Early Educators’ Implicit Biases Regarding Sex and Race Relate to Behavior Expectations and Recommendations of Preschool Expulsions and Suspensions?